It will take a strong dose of patience, and NOT grabbing them and holding them.

A chair in the run. Just sit there quietly, don’t move and don’t talk too much. Stay for a while. Next day repeat. Just watch them, don’t move, don’t coax, just sit there, quietly. Notice how far they stay away from you. Mark the distance in your mind. Next day, pour a little treat closer than that line and go and sit quietly in your chair. After they have eaten up all the goodies, toss out a small handful, a little closer to you. Let them eat it, and when they are done and move away, leave.

Next day – go in and sit down and wait, now they should start to approach you, do NOT reach for them, sit there quietly, then move the treat jar, and toss some out, fairly close to your chair, they my dance back with the motion of your arm, but they have come to expect you to bring good things, and are no longer afraid that you are going to scare them. They should come quite close to you. Sit there quietly. As they move away, toss out a bit more, they will come back more quickly.

Keep doing this, and one of them will eventually jump in your lap.

I do have a friend that also, always strokes them in the near dark at night while they are on the roost.

I did do all of this, and discovered I really didn’t like them sitting on me. But to each his own. I am pretty positive this will work with any chicken, so get what you want and what you can.

Mrs K

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