I’m in western WA, zone 8B. Lots of rain in fall and spring, dry but generally not overly hot summers, some snow in winter.

Busts for the year:
– Monstrueux de Viroflay Spinach. Don’t know if it was just the seeds I got or what, but I couldn’t get these to germinate for anything. Probably put a good 50 seeds in the ground and got maybe 10% germination? And then slugs immediately ate whatever popped up. Meanwhile my 3 year old Bloomsdale spinach seeds still showed decent germination, like 50%, and the plants grew quickly enough that I had some spinach to harvest.
– Hedou Tiny Bok Choy. “Tiny” being the key word. Too tiny to do much with, and then instantly bolts at first sign of heat. Can’t really harvest anything from the bolted plants because the leaves are so tiny in the first place. I haven’t had luck with bok choy in general (bolting has been a problem) so not going to grow any of it any more.

From last 2 years:
– Cosmic Purple or Purple Dragon (can’t remember which) Carrots. Mine got woody fast, even when relatively young (I routinely leave carrots in from spring through very late fall, until the ground starts frosting over). Not sweet, kind of hard, slightly spicy. Just not what I want out of a carrot (tender, sweet).
– Danvers 126 Half Long Carrot and Kuroda Carrots. Just not great? Neither was as sweet or remained as tender at larger sizes as my preferred carrots (what I DO like are Nantes, Imperator, and Amarillo Carrots – all three of those routinely come out sweet and tender and keep well in ground).
– Shogoin Turnip. I specifically wanted it for the greens, having seen it listed on a “turnips for tasty greens” list, but the greens were not good. Nor were the turnips, all of them went woody on me even while relatively small/young. I now grow the standard Purple Top Turnips which take much longer to go woody, and has tastier greens.
– Albino Beets. For a beet specifically labeled as sweet, they weren’t really sweet and frankly, pretty bland. Golden Beets are my go to, sweet and tender without the earthiness or the messiness of red beets.

Ha, collards did well for me last year so I thought to myself, heck, I should grow more this year! I seeded for 8 plants. Now I have a bunch of collards along with the realization that only I’ve been eating them… So guess what’s on the schedule for dinner next week? 2 days of collards. Rather than cut-and-come-again I just pull up entire plants.

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